Industrial Utility Efficiency    

The System Assessment

Food

As readers of this publication know, there are many ways to save energy in industrial compressed

Plastics

The beverage industry has been using polyethylene terephthalate (PET) 2-liter plastic bottles

Paper

This paper mill currently spends $1,747,000 annually on energy to operate the compressed air

Printing

Several days prior to our visit, during a cold winter evening, the lead air compressor in one

Pharmaceutical

The United States accounts for roughly half of the global pharmaceutical market. This certainly

Auto

This northeastern U.S. automotive manufacturing facility spends $269,046 annually on energy to

Transit

Boeing Canada Winnipeg (BCW) has been recognized with the best improvement project of 2013 within

Metals

Quite a number of worst-case compressed air scenarios have been encountered over the years but none

Medical

In the U.S. as an example, the NFPA has taken the view that if your compressor draws in good clean

Power

Nuclear power plants produce electricity for people, business and industry.  Electricity is

Oil & Gas

Sullair of Houston, one of the largest North American distributors of Sullair industrial and

Wastewater

Recently the capacity of the Las Palmas, California, waste water treatment operations were expanded
Plug an electrical device into an outlet. Does it work? Great! For some people that’s all that matters. When it comes to compressed air, many manufacturing plants operate the same way. As long as there is enough air, that’s all that matters. But what if cost control also matters to your company? Smart compressed air users may already know how much air they’re producing, but they also want to know how much air they’re using—and whether they’re using it productively. To find out, they’re taking accurate, real-time measurements using flow meters.  
In 1979 I received a call from a business friend that had just purchased his first single-stage base cup blow machine. He was surprised to find out that he actually needed something more than 100 psi of plant air to blow bottles. This was my entry into engineering a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) compressor system. Since then, I have engineered and delivered over 350 systems—from Tobago to Tibet—and many locations in between.
The beverage industry has been using polyethylene terephthalate (PET) 2-liter plastic bottles primarily for packaging carbonated soft drinks since the 1970s. As that market has grown to encompass bottled drinking water, stretch blow-molding machines continue to produce those plastic bottles. The concept is simple: A pre-form plug is inserted into the blow molding machine heated, and compressed air is injected, “blowing” into the pre-form to create the bottle.