Industrial Utility Efficiency    

Compressor Controls

Quite often the typical variability in compressed air flow demand does not proportionately translate into power reductions at the air compressors. This can be a result of numerous problems with the compressed air supply system. It is important to understand the supply-side’s ability to respond to the demand-side of the compressed air system. If the air compressors, on the supply-side, are not able to translate flow reductions into energy savings, implementation of demand reduction projects should be re-evaluated.  
Reducing energy costs and pollution emissions involves many areas within an industrial facility.  My studies have found seven (7) key (or common) areas where low cost practical projects can be implemented.  Combined, these projects provide savings exceeding 10% of the annual energy spend with an average payback of less than one year.
How do you test a 747 engine to ensure reliability once it’s airborne at 600 miles an hour?
Compressed Air Best Practices Magazine interviewed Sid Van der Meer (President) and Terry Nickel (Office Manager) of the Northwest Equipment Company.
Compressed Air Best Practices spoke with Jay Hedges (General Manager) of Mattei Compressors.
A four thousand, five hundred and fifty pound (4550 lbs.) race car is running at 170 mph and facing wind resistance of 150 mph. The car then enters a curve creating a three-degree “yaw” (the change in angle from the direction the car is headed and the airstream).  The car struggles to maintain speed as the yaw changes and the dynamic downforce load on the car changes.  Suddenly, the driver-less car comes to a stop on the stainless-steel track...